Why Am I Having Pregnancy Symptoms but a Negative Test?

Updated on January 18, 2019
Kierstin Gunsberg profile image

Kierstin has taken probably every single brand and style of pregnancy test that exists. Twice, they turned positive.

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You're gagging at the smell of your coworker's lunch and skipping yoga because you're just too tired to do anything in leggings that doesn't involve Netflix, so you take a pregnancy test because you're obviously pregnant except...you're not? The test is negative. WHAT IN THE ACTUAL?!

Here are some reasons you might be feeling pregnant with a negative test:

  • You're not pregnant, your symptoms are from something else entirely (like maybe not wanting to chat with Orchid about her enlightening trip to three wineries over the weekend).
  • You're pregnant, but it's too early to test so you got a negative result.
  • Your urine is diluted from drinking too much water in preparation to take the test.
  • You're ovulating, so those surging hormones are making you feel rough.
  • You really want to be pregnant and your body is playing tricks on you.
  • You're taking the wrong test and you need to use one that'll be accurate at this stage in your cycle.

Why Your Test is Negative But You Still Feel Super Pregnant

You’re Not Pregnant

This is the most likely scenario, since oftentimes, once you’re experiencing noticeable pregnancy symptoms, the hormones are built up enough in your body to produce an accurate positive result.

So, if the test is negative and you’re feeling sick, it could be that you’re dealing with PMS symptoms. Remember, PMS symptoms and early pregnancy symptoms often overlap. It's strange because before I became pregnant for the first time, I didn't notice much besides some extra bloating and hunger before my period was supposed to start. I wasn't thinking about getting or being pregnant so any unpleasant stuff like random nausea, dizzy spells or using the bathroom more frequently just got written off.

But after my first pregnancy, I noticed allllllllll of the symptoms - the sore throat, the runny nose, the achy legs - everything became a possible pregnancy symptom.

So what symptoms commonly happen during both early pregnancy and PMS? According to Count Down to Pregnancy's surveys of pregnant and non-pregnant women, at 12 DPO (days past ovulation), which is usually two days before your period is supposed to start, it's common for both pregnant and non-pregnant women to experience:

  • Tiredness. I'm always so, so tired in the day or two leading up to my period. Likewise, I found myself worn out just from doing my hair in the morning during the early days of both of my pregnancies.
  • Slight cramps. With my first daughter, I had so many signs that I was about to start my period that, including cramps that felt just like the start of my menstrual cycle, that it didn't occur to me to take a pregnancy test until I was already late.
  • Gas and bloating. If you're suddenly bloated and gassy it can be easy to suspect pregnancy, but these symptoms are also super common right before your period starts.

If you're wondering why so many PMS symptoms are similar to early pregnancy symptoms, it's because progesterone (which is responsible for the fatigue, cramps, bloating and gas) increases before your period starts and it increases in early pregnancy. So whether you're pregnant or not, there's certain symptoms you're almost certain to experience right around the time your period is due each month and oftentimes the only way to tell if they're due to pregnancy or PMS is if you miss your period.

You’re Pregnant, But It's Too Early to Test

Some women are really good at noticing the subtle differences in their body and hormones when they’re newly pregnant - even before a pregnancy test can. Some of the more nuanced symptoms that I experienced in early pregnancy which tipped me off to taking a test was that everything suddenly tasted so salty it made my tongue burn and I felt rather giddy and positive during times of the month when my hormones often made me feel more somber and anxious.

Make sure you’re not testing too early on - if you’re more than four days from the day of your expected period, then there’s a solid chance you could be pregnant but you’re not far enough along for the test to turn positive.

In my own experience, I once tested around five days before my period was due to start because I just felt very pregnant. I used an early response test that said it could be used like six days before my missed period. Yet, the test came out negative. Undeterred, two days later, I tested again only to find that the test was obviously positive and I was indeed pregnant. So learn from me to hold off and try again in two days, since the pregnancy hormone HCG, which is what your pregnancy test depends on to turn positive, doubles every 48 hours.

You're Too Hydrated

Another reason you might be feeling pregnant yet getting a negative pregnancy test is that your urine is too diluted when you test it.

The more water, juice, etc. that you consume, the more hydrated you become. The more hydrated you are, the less concentrated your pee will be. And, when your pee isn't concentrated, there's less pregnancy hormone (HCG) in it. Especially in early pregnancy, when HCG is often scarce, it's important to take your test at a time when there's enough hormone for the test to read.

So, though it's tempting to take a test in the middle of the day after running out to the drug store, if you're testing before your period is even supposed to start, or just a day or so after you've missed it, you really should try to hold off and test straight away in the morning before you've had anything to eat or drink, ensuring that your urine is concentrated.

Drinking a bunch of water or apple juice so you can muster up enough pee to take a pregnancy test? Stop! Concentrated urine is the most accurate when detecting early pregnancy.
Drinking a bunch of water or apple juice so you can muster up enough pee to take a pregnancy test? Stop! Concentrated urine is the most accurate when detecting early pregnancy. | Source

Symptoms During Your Cycle

How close to starting your period are you?

See results

You're Ovulating

Surprise! Ovulation can actually make you feel really awful. For many of us, Mittelschmerz and ovulation sickness are a very real thing that happens midway through our cycle (about two weeks after our last period started and two weeks before the next one is supposed to start).

As your body readies itself to be fertile you might experience pain on either side of your abdomen, lower back pain, nausea, hunger, bloating and fatigue. It doesn't mean you're pregnant, it just means you're at the right time to become pregnant and your hormones are doing their lovely (awful) thing!

You Really Want to Be Pregnant

Your coffee tastes bad, you woke up with a headache, your stomach made a weird noise, you farted, you cried during a Tampax ad - you must be pregnant, right? Eh, maybe. It's called symptom-spotting and anyone whose ever Googled "Am I pregnant?" has done it and according to my analytics that's a lot of people, me included.

Unfortunately, there's nothing more convincing that you're pregnant than really, really wanting to be pregnant. Since we're human, and no matter how many of the right foods we eat, exercises we try out or brisk walks we take, there will always be aches, pains, hiccups and waves of nausea and dizziness. This means that if you're looking for pregnancy symptoms, you can almost always find them - even when you're not pregnant.

If you're timing that baby dance down to the hour, your mind could be playing tricks on you with each little twinge.
If you're timing that baby dance down to the hour, your mind could be playing tricks on you with each little twinge. | Source

You're Taking the Wrong Test

OMG there's so many pregnancy tests it can be dizzying if you're not already dizzy, and I've learned the hard way that not all tests are created equal!

The first thing you need to consider before you even buy a pregnancy test is "Where am I at in my cycle?" Are you already late for your period? Is it more than a week away? Do you have irregular periods and you're not sure when you're even supposed to start?

For instance, if you're not supposed to start your period for another four days, you don't want to buy a rapid response test because it's meant to read your urine quickly and will need a really high amount of HCG, normally found after your missed period, to even read it. Likewise, if you're still a few days out from starting your period, you don't want to mess with a digital test because those also take higher levels of HCG to produce a positive result. Taking one of these tests early on and getting a negative result doesn't actually mean you're not pregnant, it means the test isn't right for you at this stage of your pregnancy. Instead, you need an early result test - one that tests for low levels of HCG.


What Kind of Pregnancy Test Should I Take and When?

If your period is still over a week away...
If your period is less than a week away...
If your period is due in the next 4 days...
If your period is late...
If you don't know when your period is due because you have irregular cycles...
You probablly should take a pregnancy test yet. If you really, really need to pee on something, grab some internet cheapies off Amazon, a dollar store test, or one of those cheap WalMart pink dye tests. The result will most likely not be accurate, but you won't feel bad for spending too much money to pee on something.
Try an early response test. I never reccommend blue dye tests unless you're late for your period. They're notorious for false positives. Instead, I go by the gold standard - a First Response Early Result pregnancy test, otherwise known as FRER. These are pretty dang accurate, and get more accurate as you get closer to your period. With my second daughter I took one when I was still 3 or 4 days away from my period and it gave me a positive result. Keep in mind that only "early result" tests will work at this stage, not digitals and not rapid response.
You can start with a FRER and if it's positive and you want to confirm, you can give a digital test a chance. Don't freak out though if you get a positive FRER and a negative digital test - digital tests require more HCG to say "pregnant"
Now's the time to rip open a Rapid Response test. First Response has a good one and it read a higher level of HCG but it also gives you a result pretty instantly, like, while you're still peeing on it. You can also accurately use a digital at this point (usually).
If you're not sure when your period is actually supposed to start, or where you're at in your cycle, but you suspect you might be pregnant, invest in a box or two of internet cheapies. These are brands like ClinicalGuard and WondFo which can be found on Amazon. I like these for testing regularly because you get a bunch for really cheap (usually around 20-25 for $8) and you can take one every other morning just to keep track of things if you have an irregular cycle. A word of warning though - don't let these develop for too long. If you don't have a second line after ten minutes, throw the test away and don't look at it again. These often develop a second "line" after sitting for a few hours, even when you're not pregnant.
Use this guide to figure out what test is going to be most reliable for you at each stage of your cycle.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and does not substitute for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, prescription, and/or dietary advice from a licensed health professional. Drugs, supplements, and natural remedies may have dangerous side effects. If pregnant or nursing, consult with a qualified provider on an individual basis. Seek immediate help if you are experiencing a medical emergency.

Questions & Answers

    © 2019 Kierstin Gunsberg

    Comments

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      • Hayley Dodwell profile image

        Hayley Dodwell 

        3 weeks ago from United Kingdom

        An extremely interesting read, thank you!

      • Keep Fit Simple Mom profile image

        Brianna 

        4 weeks ago from Alabama

        Been feeling suuuper pregnant lately and test say "nope!" And not too sure if it'sme being anxious or not. I'm just gonna wait it out a bit for another test. Thank you for being thorough!

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